Program

2017 CONGRESS ON GASTROINTESTINAL FUNCTION
PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE

MONDAY, APRIL 10

08:00–14:00
REGISTRATION, Gleacher Center, First Floor Foyer
Please pick up your registration materials, name tag, and mixer drink tickets at the registration desk before you enter the auditorium. Mount posters on boards provided (6th floor).
08:00–13:00
SPECIAL SESSION (Separate registration required.)

Early Acquisition and Development of the Gut Microbiota: A Comparative Analysis

Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom
08:30
Introduction—Chairperson
Rod Mackie; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
08:40
Mopping up spilled milk: Restoring ecosystem function in the nursing infant gut microbiome
David Mills; University of California, Davis
09:20
The perinatal microbiome and finding unexpected answers
Kjersti Aagaard; Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA
10:00
Tea break
10:30
Early life nutrition and gut microbiome development in the piglet
Sharon Donovan; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
11:10
Assessment of neonatal gut microbiomes reveals microbial markers linked to calf gut health
Leluo Guan; University of Alberta, Canada
11:50
The dynamics of microbiota development in chickens
Rob Moore; Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia
12:30
Chairperson, Speakers and Panel Discussion
13:00
Workshop close
13:00–14:00
LUNCH (Please make your own arrangements.)
14:00–16:30
2017 OPENING SESSION
Bryant Memorial Lecture and Invited Presentations

Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom
14:00–14:10
Welcome and introduction of the Marvin P. Bryant Memorial Lecture speaker
Rod Mackie, Congress Chair; University of Illinois, USA
14:10–15:00
Bacterial energetics: The sixth antimicrobial target space for drug development
(Presentation of Honorary Plaque by CGIF chair)
Greg Cook; University of Otago, New Zealand
15:00–15:45
Glycan uptake in the gut Bacteroidetes: The Sus paradigm
Nicole Koropatkin; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
15:45–16:30
Functional analysis of the gut microbiota using single cell isotope probing
David Berry; University of Vienna, Austria
16:45–19:00
WELCOME MIXER, Gleacher Center, 6th floor, room 621

Informal poster viewing session
All attendees, please wear your name tags.
Refreshments: drink tickets, hors d’oeuvres, and cash bar

TUESDAY, APRIL 11

08:30–09:00
Continental breakfast, First Floor, near Tiered Classroom
Morning Session Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom
09:00–10:30
Podium presentations Session 1
09:00–09:45
Modulation of the human gut microbiota—An ecological perspective
Jens Walter; University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
09:45–10:05
High-resolution tracking of microbial colonization in fecal microbiota transplantation experiments via metagenome-assembled genomes
S. Lee, S. Kahn, T. Delmont, N. Hubert, H. Morrison, D. Antonopoulos, D. Rubin, A. Eren; University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
10:05–10:25
Using culturomics approaches to quantitate the diversity of bacteria that can be recovered from cultivation of infant feces
X. Pang, C. Mendez-Garcia, S. Donovan, M. Wang, M. Siegel, I. Cann, R. Mackie; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
10:30–11:00
Coffee break
11:00–12:00
Podium presentations Session 1 continued
11:00–11:20
Large-scale network analysis of food, nutrients, and microbiome
P.-J. Kim; Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
11:20–11:40
Evaluation of organism identification for 16S rRNA sequencing of chicken cecal microbiome
J. C. Hsieh, C. J. Schmidt, S. J. Lamont; Iowa State University, Ames, USA
11:40–12:00
Stable isotope tracking of metabolically active rumen bacteria in an in vitro system under acidotic conditions
R. M. Petri, Q. Zebelli; University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
12:00–13:00
BUSINESS MEETING (Open to all attendees.)
12:00–13:00
LUNCH (Please make your own arrangements.)
Afternoon Session Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom
13:30–14:50
Podium presentations Session 2
13:30–14:10
Microbial endocrinology—How does stress and tension influence the composition and functioning of gut bacteria?
Primrose Freestone; University of Leicester, UK
14:10–14:30
Environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene impacts the volatile metabolome and transcriptome of the human gut microbiota
C. Defois, J. Ratel, S. Denis, F. Mercier, C. Gasc, E. Peyretaillade, E. Engel, B. Peyrat; UMR 454 Microbiologie, Environnement Digestif et Santé, Clermont-Ferrand, France
14:30–14:50
Chemerin is present in intestinal epithelia of calves with a potential role in barrier function
Y. Suzuki, S. Roh, H. Hiyashi, S. Koike, Y. Kobayashi; Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
14:50–15:20
Coffee break
15:20–16:20
Podium presentations Session 2 continued
15:20–15:40
The curious case of ruminal cellulose degradation: New players and old
A. E. Naas, L. M. Solden, I. M. Hegennes, N. M. Koropatkin, R. I. Mackie, V. G. H. Eljsink, M. O. Arntzen, P. B. Pope; Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Aas, Norway and other Institutions
15:40–16:00
New roles in hemicellulosic sugar fermentation for the uncultivated Bacteroidetes family BS11
L. M. Solden, D. W. Hoyt, W. B. Collins, J. E. Plank, R. A. Daly, E. Hildebrand, R. Wolfe, C. D. Nicora, S. O. Purvine, M. Carstensen, M. S. Lipton, D. E. Spallinger, J. Firkins, B. A. Wolfe, K. C. Wrighton; The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA
16:00–16:20
Analysis of the ammonium assimilation pathways of the human colonic bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron
M. Iakiviak, I. Cann, R. I. Mackie; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
16:30–18:30
POSTER SESSION AND MIXER
Gleacher Center, 6th floor, room 621

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12

08:30–09:00
Continental breakfast, First Floor, near Tiered Classroom
Morning Session Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom
09:00–10:00
Podium presentations Session 3
09:00–09:20
PorkBoostEB: a new Bacillus subtilis-based probiotic that improves gut health in piglets
R. Cernat, B. Nielsen; Chr Hansen A/S, Hørsholm, Denmark
09:20–09:40
A formulated yeast blend and Bacillus probiotic fed to sows alters the fecal microbial ecology of their offspring
E. Davis, J. Rehberger, J. Sawall, A. H. Smith, R. Song, K. Friesen; Agro Biosciences Inc., Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, USA
09:40–10:00
Modulation of yeast probiotic activities by manipulating cell wall mannan oligosaccharide
S. Kwak, J. J. Liu, Y. S. Jin; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
10:00–10:30
Coffee break
10:30–12:00
Podium presentations Session 3 continued
10:30–11:10
Microbial perspectives on host evolution
Katherine Amato; Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA
11:10–11:30
Interspecies hydrogen transfer and its effects on global transcript abundance in Ruminococcus albus, a predominant fiber-degrading species in the rumen, and Wolinella succinogenes, a syntrophic partner
R. R. Geier, I. H. Kwon, I. Cann, R. I. Mackie; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
11:30–11:50
Structural biology of methanobacterial enzymes for fun and profit
V. Carbone, L. R. Schofield, Y. Zhang, I. M. Hannus, D. Schafer R. Atua, C. Sang, S. Molano, C. Nicol, B. P. Subedi, W. F. Martin, A. J. Sutherland-Smith, R. S. Ronimus; AgResearch and Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
12:00–13:00
LUNCH (Please make your own arrangements.)
Afternoon Session Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom
13:00–14:00
Podium presentations Session 4
13:00–13:20
Comparative microbiome analysis between sheep rumen and rabbit cecum provides new insight into their differential methane production
L. Mi, B. Yang, Z. Yu, J. Liu, J. Wang; Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; and The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA
13:20–13:40
Winners and losers: Microorganisms impacted by inflammation in the gut
M. A. Borton, A. Sabag-Diagle, J. Wu, L. M. Solden, B. S. O’Banion, R. A. Daly, J. F. Gonzalez, V. H. Wysocki, B. M. M. Ahmer, K. C. Wrighton; The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA
13:40–14:00
Addition of arginine and citrate enhances bacterial growth and fluoroacetate degradation of Cloacibacillus sp. MFA1
S. Kang, S. Denman, C. McSweeney; CSIRO, Brisbane, Australia
14:00–14:30
Coffee break
14:30–15:30
Podium presentations Session 4 continued
14:30–14:50
Biochanin A selectively inhibits carbohydrate-utilizing bacteria in the bovine rumen.
B. E. Harlow, G. E. Aiken, M. D. Flythe; USDA-ARS, Forage-Animal Production Research Unit, Lexington, KY, USA
14:50–15:10
Modulation of sub-acute ruminal acidosis by active-dry yeast supplementation and its effect on rumen fungal and protozoal populations in liquid, solid, and epimural fractions
S. Ishaq, O. AlZahai, N. Walker, B. McBride; Ishaq Informatics, Bozeman, Montana, AB Vista UK; and University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
15:10–15:30
Changes in rumen microbes’ quantity and volatile fatty acid concentrations during adaptation period of dairy cows to changing diet
L. Mamuad, S. Kim, M. Lee, Y. Choi, C. Lee, Z. Yu, S. Lee; Sunchon National University, South Korea; and The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA
15:30–15:45
PRESENTATION OF RUSSELL AWARDS
15:45
CLOSING REMARKS and INVITATION TO CGIF 2019

All other accepted abstracts will be presented as posters. Board numbers to be assigned. Informal poster viewing will take place during the Welcome Mixer on Monday evening and during the Poster Session on Tuesday evening.

Poster boards will be 48” x 48”. Push-pins will be provided.

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

30
Starter feeding altered colonic mucosal bacterial communities and modulated mucosal immune homeostasis during milk-feeding period in lambs.
J. Liu*1, G. Bian2, D. Sun1, W. Zhu1, and S. Mao1, 1Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, 2Tianyi Health Science Research Institute, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, China.
32
Effect of feeding increasing levels of Aspergillus terreus fermented palm kernel cake on methane emission in goats.
J. B. Liang*1, M. F. Mahadzir1, S. Garba1, M. F. Jahromi2, S. C. L. Candyrine1, R. Ronimus3, S. Muetzel3, and A. A. Samsudin1, 1Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia, 2Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran, Mashad, Iran, 3AgResearch, New Zealand.
33
Effects of lysozyme on in vitro fermentation, methanogenesis, and microbial community structure of the rumen.
Y. Chen1, J. Shen*1,2, W. Zhu1, and Z. Yu2, 1Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, 2The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
34
Regulation of the small intestine development at preterm weaning.
L. Kuchkarova*, G. Kudeshova, G. Dustmatova, and I. Karimova, National University of Uzbekistan, Tashkent, Uzbekistan.
35
Anti-Salmonella and uric acid-preserving effect of pine bark tannin in composted poultry litter.
C. Arzola-Alvarez*1, R. C. Anderson2, M. E. Hume2, O. Ruiz-Barrera1, Y. Castillo-Castillo3, B. R. Min5, J. A. Byrd2, D. J. Nisbet2, J. Salinas-Chavira4, M. Ontiveros-Magadan1, and C. Rodriguez-Muela1, 1Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico, 2USDA, ARS, College Station, TX, USA, 3Universidad Autonoma de Cd. Juarez, Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, 4Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas, Cd. Victoria, Tamaulipas, Mexico, 5Tuskagee University, Tuskagee, AL, USA.
36
Nitro-treatment of composted poultry litter, effects on Salmonella, E. coli, and nitrogen.
O. Ruiz-Barrera*1, C. Arzola-Alvarez1, Y. Castillo-Castillo2, A. Corral-Luna1, R. C. Anderson3, J. A. Byrd3, M. E. Hume3, D. J. Nisbet3, and J. Salinas-Chavira4, 1Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico, 2Universidad Autonoma de Juarez, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, 3ARS/USDA, Texas, College Station, TX, USA, 4Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas, Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
37
Clostridium perfringens infection of the chicken induces immunometabolic alterations in the duodenum that includes the glycolytic and insulin signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory cell death.
M. Kogut*1 and R. Arsenault2, 1USDA-ARS, College Station, TX, USA, 2University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA.
38
The effects of loxoribine, a toll-like receptor agonist, on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium growth in rumen fluid.
C. L. Swaggerty* and T. R. Callaway, USDA/ARS, College Station, TX, USA.
39
Comparing the responses of rumen ciliate protozoa and bacteria to excess carbohydrate.
C. Teixeira1, R. de Paula Lana1, J. Tao2, and T. Hackmann*2, 1Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 2University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
40
Census of the rumen microbiome using 16s rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing.
E. A. Latham*1,2 and W. E. Pinchak2, 1Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA, 2Texas A&M Agrilife Research, Vernon, TX, USA.
41
Resolution of the amino acid requirements for Clostridium scindens ATCC 35704, a major bile acid-dehydroxylating anaerobe in the human gut.
R. Shrestha* and S. Daniel, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA.
42
Effects of nitrogen source and monensin on in vitro ruminal ammonia production and proteolytic bacterial community structure.
J. Shen*1,2, Z. Yu2, and W. Zhu1, 1Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, 2The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
43
Comparative analysis of bacterial microbial composition from the different ruminal ecological niche of Alxa Bactrian camel.
J. Zhao*1,2, Z. Yu2, G. Wang1, J. Li1, and H. Wu1, 1Inner Mongolia University for Nationalities, Tongliao, Inner Mongolia, China, 2The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
44
Determination of succession of rumen bacterial species in nursing beef calves.
K. Smith*1, A. Garza1, K. Butterfield1, A. Dickey2, A. Lindholm-Perry2, J. Wells2, H. Freetly2, and S. Ivey1, 1New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA, 2U.S. Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, NE, USA.
45
Identification and biochemical characterization of three bile salt hydrolases in the human gut microbe Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482.
L. Ly*, S. Devendran, and J. Ridlon, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.
46
Isolation and partial characterization of starch degrading bacteria belonging to core phylotypes of rumen microbiota in Japanese Black cattle.
S. Koike*1, Y. Akiyama1, T. Hashimoto1, R. Inoue2, T. Endo3, Y. Suzuki1, and Y. Kobayashi1, 1Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan, 2Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto, Japan, 3Hokkaido Research Organization, Hokkaido, Japan.
47
Prokaryotes inside and outside of ruminal ciliates isolated from rumen fluid and in vitro culture.
T. Park* and Z. Yu, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
48
Draft macronuclear genome of Entodinium caudatum.
T. Park*, S. Wijeratne, T. Meulia, and Z. Yu, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
49
Growth inhibitory effects of monensin on ruminal bacteria.
N. Kim*, I. K. O. Cann, and R. I. Mackie, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
50
A simplified bacterial community in gnotobiotic mice is insufficient to study community dynamics concerning resistant starch digestion.
J. P. Sementkowski* and N. M. Koropatkin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
51
Bacteria and fungi in day-old turkeys vary between companies and flocks.
A. H. Smith* and T. G. Rehberger, Agro BioSciences, Milwaukee, WI, USA.
52
Pectin utilization by the human colonic bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis DSM17393.
H. Müller Paul*, R. I. Mackie, and I. Cann, Carl R. Woese institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA.
53
Feeding the natural plant extract β-resorcylic acid reduces enteric colonization and down-regulates attachment and gene expression of the foodborne pathogen Campylobacter in chickens.
A. M. Donoghue*1, B. R. Wagle2, A. Upadhyay2, K. Arsi2, S. Shrestha2, K. Venkitanarayanan3, and D. J. Donoghue2, 1Poultry Production and Product Safety Research Unit, ARS, USDA, Fayetteville, AR, USA, 2Department of Poultry Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA, 3Department of Animal Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.
54
Elucidating the ecology of Fibrobacter spp. in the herbivore gut using comparative genomics.
A. Neumann* and G. Suen, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
55
Functional analyses of an esterase-enriched polysaccharide utilization locus conserved in diverse human colonic Bacteroidetes.
G. V. Pereira*, D. Wefers, T. Natof, R. I. Mackie, and I. Cann, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA.
56
Sequence-based analysis of the genus Ruminococcus resolves its phylogeny and reveals strong host association.
A. J. La Reau*1, J. P. Meier-Kolthoff2, and G. Suen1, 1University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States, 2Leibniz Institute DSMZ–German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Braunschweig, Germany.
57
The effects of nitrate and nitrite on rumen protozoal chemotaxis and yeast growth.
C. M. Welty1, S. Waits1, A. M. Gehman2, Y. Roman-Garcia*1, J. Plank1, R. Meller1, and J. L. Firkins1, 1The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA, 2Alltech Inc, Nicholasville, KY, USA.
58
Conversion of 12-ketolithocholate to deoxycholate by Clostridium scindens, Clostridium hylemonae, and Clostridium hiranonis, major bile acid-metabolizing anaerobes in the human gut.
L. Sallam*1, J. Ridlon2, G. Doden2, H. Doden2, and S. Daniel1, 1Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA, 2University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA.
60
Assessment of the effect of high quality hay on rumen health through epithelial gene expression and epimural microbiota.
R. M. Petri*, M. T. Kleefisch, Q. Zebeli, and F. Kleverhusen, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.
61
Feed efficiency phenotypes in lambs involve changes in ruminal, colonic, and small intestine-located microbiota.
K. Perea, K. Perz, S. Olivo, A. Williams, M. Lachman, S. Ishaq*, J. Thomson, and C. Yeoman, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, USA.
63
Effect of antibiotics, Diamond V Original XPC, and Lactobacillus plantarum on broiler performance.
S. Rasoulzadeh1, S. Rahimi*1, and K. Akbari2, 1Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Tehran, Iran, 2National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
64
Comparison the effect of antibiotic, probiotic, prebiotic, phytobiotic, and Bacillus subtilis on broiler performance.
M. Hamidi1, S. Rahimi*1, and N. Mojgani2, 1Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Tehran, Iran, 2Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, Karaj, Alborz, Iran.
65
Functional properties of lablab bean husk and soybean husk in hindgut fermentation and microbiota of rats.
H. Myint*, H.i Kishi, Y. Iwahashi, W. Saburi, S. Koike, and Y. Kobayashi, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.
66
Characterization of probiotic abilities of lactobacilli isolated from Iranian Koozeh traditional cheese.
M. Tavakoli1, Z. Hamadi-Esfahani*1, M. A. Hejazi2, M. H. Azizi1, and S. Abbasi1, 1Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Tehran, Iran, 2Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran, Tabriz, E. Azarbayjan, Iran.
67
Antagonistic effects of lipids against the bactericidal activity of thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside.
R. C. Anderson*1, G. Levent1,2, B. Petrujkic1,3, G. Ciftcioglu2, R. B. Harvey1, M. H. Hume1, H. He1, K. J. Genovese1, R. C. Beier1, C. L. Swaggerty1, T. R. Callaway1, and D. J. Nisbet1, 1USDA/ARS, College Station, TX, USA, 2Istandbul University, Istanbul, Turkey, 3University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.
68
Identification and characterization of a 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the human gut microbe Bifidobacterium adolescentis.
S. Mythen*, S. Devendran, and J. Ridlon, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA.
69
Inhibitory effect of two indigenous Bacillus strains on growth of some plant pathogenic fungi and mycotoxins reduction.
F. Siahmoshteh1, Z. Hamidi-Esfahani*1, and M. Razzaghi Abyaneh2, 1Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Tehran, Iran, 2Pasteur Institute, Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
70
The effect of antibiotic, probiotic and prebiotic (Diamond Original XPC) in reducing colonization of Campylobacter jejuni in intestine of broilers.
N. Soltani1, S. Rahimi*1, and P. Khaki2, 1Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Tehran, Iran, 2Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, Karaj, Alborz, Iran.
71
Improving gut microbiome function via high-throughput screening of biological and chemical compounds.
L. Marsh and M. Hess*, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.
72
Composting of laying hen litter with the addition of a yeast probiotic.
Y. Castillo-Castillo*1, J. D. Rivera1, O. Ruiz-Barrera2, M. Itza1, C. Arzola2, M. E. Hume3, R. C. Anderson3, J. Salinas4, and A. Corral2, 1Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, 2Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico, 3USDA/ARS, College Station, TX, USA, 4Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas, Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
73
Influence of a direct-fed microbial on growth performance and digestibility of broiler chicks fed commercially available diets.
J. Barnes*, J. Ison, and R. Carpenter, BiOWiSH Technologies Inc, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
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Phone: (217) 356-3182
Fax: (217) 398-4119
Email: CGIF@assochq.org