Program

Final 2019 Program and Abstract Book

2019 CONGRESS ON GASTROINTESTINAL FUNCTION
PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE

Monday, April 15

08:00–14:00
Registration
Gleacher Center, First Floor Foyer

Please pick up your registration materials, name tag, and welcome mixer drink tickets at the registration desk before you enter the auditorium.

Poster presenters: Please use your assigned abstract number (see page 9) to post your presentation on the corresponding numbered poster board (6th floor, room 621).

Special Session: “Bugs and Drugs” (separate registration required)
Chair: Rod Mackie, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom

08:30–08:40
Introduction.
Rod Mackie, Chair, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.
08:40–09:25
1 — Invited talk: Natural product biosynthesis by posttranslational modification.
W. van der Donk*, Department of Chemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
09:25–10:10
2 — Invited talk: A genetic approach to uncovering host–microbe metabolic interactions in the gut.
D. Dodd*, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
10:10–10:40
Tea break
10:40–11:25
3 — Invited talk: High-throughput approaches to study microbial–drug interactions.
N. Typas*, EMBL Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
11:25–12:10
4 — Invited talk: Systematic identification of drug-metabolizing gut microbes and their gene products.
M. Zimmermann*, M. Zimmermann-Kogadeeva, R. Wegmann, and A. L. Goodman, Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Microbial Sciences Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
12:10
Workshop close
12:15–13:30
Lunch (please make your own arrangements)

2019 Opening Session
Invited Presentations and Bryant Memorial Lecture

Chair: Rod Mackie, Congress Chair, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom

13:30–13:40
Welcome.
Rod Mackie, Chair, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.
13:40–14:25
5 — Invited talk: Harnessing the gut microbiome to improve the treatment of chronic disease.
P. J. Turnbaugh*1,2, 1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA, 2Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, CA, USA.
14:25–15:10
6 — Invited talk: Potential drivers of plasticity and persistence in the animal gut microbiome.
I. Mizrahi*, The Department of Life Sciences and the National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer- Sheva, Israel.
15:10–15:40
Coffee break
15:40–16:25
7 — Bryant Memorial Lecture
Not all methane is created equally: Concepts and consequences for a diet-induced inflammatory microbiota?

M. Morrison*, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Australia.
16:25
Presentation of Honorary Plaque.
Rod Mackie, Chair, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.
16:30–18:30
Welcome Mixer(please wear your name tag)
Gleacher Center, Sixth Floor (Room 621)
Refreshments: drink tickets, hors d'ouevres, cash bar
Informal poster viewing

Tuesday, April 16

08:30–09:00
Continental breakfast
First Floor, near Tiered Classroom

Podium presentations: Session 1
Chair: Isaac Cann, University of Illinois, USA
Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom

09:00–09:45
8 — Invited talk: Perinatal impacts, microbiome, and health.
M. G. Dominguez-Bello*, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.
09:45–10:05
9 — Variation in butyrate-production pathways across human and nonhuman primates.
E. K. Mallott* and K. R. Amato, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
10:05–10:25
10 — Procyanidin–cell wall interactions within apple matrices decrease the metabolization of procyanidins by the human gut microbiota and the anti-inflammatory effect of the resulting microbial metabolome in vitro.
C. Le Bourvellec1, P. Bagano Vilas Boas2, P. Lepercq3, S. Comtet-Marre3, P. Auffret3, P. Ruiz3, R. Bott1, C. Renard1, C. Dufour1, J.-M. Chatel2, and P. Mosoni*3, 1UMR408 SQPOV (Sécurité et Qualité des Produits d’Origine Végétale), INRA, Avignon, France, 2Micalis, INRA, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, Jouy-en-Josas, France, 3UMR454 MEDIS (Microbiologie, Environnement Digestif et Santé) INRA, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
10:30–11:00
Coffee break
11:00–11:20
11 — The human gut Firmicute Roseburia intestinalis is a primary degraderof dietary β-mannans.
S. L. La Rosa*1, M. Leth2, L. Michalak1, M. Ejby Hansen2, N. Pudlo3, R. Glowacki3, G. Pereira3, C. Workman2, M. Ø. Arntzen1, P. B. Pope1, E. C. Martens3, M. Abou Hachem2, and B. Westereng1, 1Faculty of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway, 2Department of Systems Biology, Danish Technical University, Lyngby, Denmark, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
11:20–11:40
12 — Sulfatases and fucosidases play critical roles in mucin utilization by Bacteroides.
A. Luis*1,3, A. Cartmell2, R. Glowacki1, J. Chunsheng3, N. Karlsson3, G. Hansson3, and E. Martens1, 1University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, 2Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom, 3Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
11:40–12:00
13 — Conserved putative RNA binding proteins regulate carbohydrate utilization in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.
A. N. D. Adams*1, Z. A. Costliow2, C. K. Vanderpool1, and P. H. Degnan3, 1Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 2The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA, 3Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA.
12:00–13:00
Business meeting: CGIF 2021 (open to all attendees)
12:00–13:00
Lunch (please make your own arrangements)

Podium presentations: Session 2
Chair: Isaac Cann, University of Illinois, USA
Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom

13:30–14:10
14 — Invited talk: Learning from the locals: Linking digestion in wild ruminants to improved diets in livestock.
B. Westereng1, J. C. Gaby1, L. M. Solden2, A. E. Naas1, S. L. La Rosa1, L. Michalak1, L. H. Hagen1, B. J. Kunath1, F. Delogu1, M. Hess3, V. G. H. Eijsink1, M. Ø. Arntzen1, T. R. Hvidsten1, K. C. Wrighton2,4, P. B. Pope*1,5, 1Faculty of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway, 2Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA, 3Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, CA, USA, 4Department of of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA, 5Faculty of Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
14:10–14:30
15 — Rumen microbial composition and fermentation profiles through divergent dietary interventions during early life in calves.
O. C. Carballo*1,2, S. A. McCoard1, K. Lowe1, S. Ganesh1, S. J. Lewis1, and S. Muetzel1, 1AgResearch, Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
14:30–14:50
16 — Early-life rumen microbiota manipulation effect on calf’s bacterial community development.
H. Huuki*1,5, S. Ahvenjärvi2, M. Popova3, J. Vilkki4, A. Vanhatalo5, and I. Tapio1, 1Natural Resources Institute Finland, Production systems, Animal genetics, Jokioinen, Finland, 2Natural Resources Institute Finland, Production systems, Milk production, Jokioinen, Finland, 3National de la Recherche Agronomique, UMR1213 Herbivores, Clermont Université, VetAgro Sup, UMR Herbivores, Clermont-Ferrand, France, 4Natural Resources Institute Finland, Service groups, Jokioinen, Finland, 5University of Helsinki, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Helsinki, Finland.
14:50–15:20
Coffee break
15:20–15:40
17 — Lactobacillus reuteri attenuates colonic mucosal disruption and inflammation following broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment.
J. Allen*1, C. Ladaika1, L. Mashburn Warren1, G. Besner2, S. Goodman1, and M. Bailey1, 1Center for Microbial Pathogenesis, Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA, 2Center for Perinatal Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.
15:40–16:00
18 — Combined low dietary fiber and mucus-degrading symbiotic gut bacteria cause lethal colitis in IL-10 deficient mice.
G. Pereira*1, M. Wolter2, M. Ostrowski1, A. Luis1, R. Glowacki1, N. Pudlo1, K. Eaton1, G. Chen1, M. Desai2, J. Chunseng3, N. Karlsson3, G. Hansson3, and E. Martens1, 1University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, 2Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxemburg, 3Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
16:00–16:20
19 — The use of chicken enterocyte culture to understand intestinal competency.
N. C. Rath*1, R. Liyuanage2, A. Gupta3, and M. Acharya1,3, 1USDA- Agricultural Research Service, Fayetteville, AR, USA, 2Statewide Mass Spectrometry Facility, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA, 3Poultry Science Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA.
16:30–18:30
Poster Session and Mixer
Gleacher Center, Sixth Floor (Room 621).

Wednesday, April 17

08:30–09:00
Continental breakfast
First Floor, near Tiered Classroom

Podium presentations: Session 3
Chair: Jeff Firkins, The Ohio State University, USA
Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom

09:00–09:20
20 — Comparative diversity of microbiomes and resistomes in beef feedlots, downstream environments and urban sewage influent.
R. Zaheer*1, S. Lakin2, R. Ortega-Polo1, S. Cook3, F. Larney1, P. Morley2, C. Booker4, G. Van Domselaar5, R. Read6, and T. McAllister1, 1Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB, Canada, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA, 3Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Lethbridge, AB, Canada, 4Feedlot Health Management Services, Okotoks, AB, Canada, 5National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada, 6Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
09:20–09:40
21 — Comparative genomics of Clostridium perfringens isolated from dairy cows with hemorrhagic bowel syndrome.
R. R. Geier*, J. S. Thompson, A. H. Smith, and T. Rehberger, Church & Dwight Co. Inc., Waukesha, WI, USA.
09:40–10:00
22 — Reduction in tetracycline-resistant bacteria during grain challenge by the red clover isoflavone biochanin A.
M. Flythe*1,2 and B. Harlow1,2, 1USDA, ARS, Lexington, KY, USA, 2University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.
10:00–10:30
Coffee break
10:30–11:10
23 — Invited talk: Dietary carbohydrate metabolism by the human gut microbiota.
P. Louis*, University of Aberdeen Rowett Institute, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
11:10–11:30
24 — Energy conservation in the rumen bacterium Pseudobutyrivibrio ruminis.
A. Katsyv*1, M. C. Schölmerich2, J. Dönig1, T. J. Hackmann3, and V. Müller1, 1Goethe University Frankfurt, Molecular Microbiology and Bioenergetics, Frankfurt/Main, Germany, 2University of Hamburg, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Hamburg, Germany, 3University of Florida, Department of Animal Sciences, Gainesville, FL, USA.
11:30–11:50
25 — Clostridium scindens ATCC 35704: Integration of nutritional requirements, the complete genome sequence, and global transcriptional responses to bile acids.
S. Devendran1,2, R. Shrestha3, J. M. P. Alves4, P. G. Wolf2, L. Ly1,5, C. Méndez-García7, A. G. Hernandez6, C. L. Wright5, C. J. Fields5, S. L. Daniel3, and J. M. Ridlon*8,9, 1Microbiome Metabolic Engineering Theme, Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 2Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 3Department of Biological Sciences, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA, 4Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, Paulo, Brazil, 5Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 6Keck Center for Biotechnology, of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 7Independent investigator, Boston, MA, USA, 8Cancer Center of Illinois, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 9Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
12:00–13:00
Lunch (please make your own arrangements)

Podium presentations: Session 4
Chair: Jeff Firkins, The Ohio State University, USA
Gleacher Center, First Floor, Tiered Classroom

13:00–13:20
26 — Impact of organic rearing on the gastrointestinal microbiota of swine.
A. Steinberger*, F. Assadi-Porter, W. Porter, and G. Suen, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
13:20–13:40
27 — Hydrolyzed casein enhances gastrointestinal chemosensing and gastric acid secretion in pigs fed low-crude-protein diets.
J. Shen1,2, H. Wang1,2, Y. Pi1,2, K. Gao1,2, Y. Cheng1,2, W. Jin1,2, and W. Zhu*1,2, 1Laboratory of Gastrointestinal Microbiology, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Gastrointestinal Nutrition and Animal Health, College of Animal Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China, 2National Center for International Research on Animal Gut Nutrition, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.
13:40–14:00
28 — Effect of feeding chlorophyll on Escherichia coli and enterococci in the pig gut.
R. C. Anderson*1, R. C. S. Mendonça1,2, M. A. Rasmussen3, H. He1, K. J. Genovese1, R. B. Harvey1, R. C. Beier1, and D. J. Nisbet1, 1United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX, USA, 2Viçosa Federal University, Viçosa, Brazil, 3Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.
14:00–14:30
Coffee break
14:30–14:50
29 — Methyl-compound production by rumen bacteria.
W. J. Kelly1, S. C. Leahy2, J. Kamke3, P. Soni2, S. Koike4, R. I. Mackie5, R. Seshadri6, G. M. Cook7, C. Greening8, and G. T. Attwood*2, 1Donvis Ltd., Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2AgResearch Ltd., Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, New Zealand, 3Horizons Regional Council, Palmerston North, New Zealand, 4Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, 5University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA, 6Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, 8Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
14:50–15:10
30 — Innate variability in animal performance across seasonal changes in a northern Australian grazing system.
S. Denman*1, G. Martinez Fernandez1, E. Charmley2, G. Bishop-Hurley1, and C. McSweeney1, 1CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Brisbane, Qld, Australia, 2CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Townsville, Qld, Australia.
15:10–15:30
31 — Temporal stability of the ruminal bacterial communities in beef steers.
B. Clemmons*1, C. Martino2, L. Schneider1, M. Embree2, and P. Myer1, 1Department of Animal Science, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, Knoxville, TN, USA, 2ASCUS Biosciences Inc, San Diego, CA, USA.
15:30–15:40
Presentation of Russell Awards.
Best oral and poster presentations by graduate students and young investigators.
15:40
Closing remarks and invitation to CGIF 2021.
CGIF 2021 will mark the 35th biennial meeting and 70 years of research in gut microbiology and its scientific communication.

Poster Presentations
Gleacher Center, 6th Floor (Room 621)

Computational approaches and applications

32
Accurate estimation of microbial sequence diversity with Distanced.
T. Hackmann*, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
33
Utilization of assembled long read amplicons to improve taxonomic resolution.
J. Rehberger* and A. Smith, Arm & Hammer Animal and Food Production, Waukesha, WI, USA.
34
Comparative genome analyses of human gut methanogens.
J. G. Volmer1, B. J. Woodcroft2, G. W. Thompson2, and M. Morrison*1, 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Australia, 2School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences and Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, University of Queensland, Saint Lucia, Australia.

Environmental impacts (including livestock waste, GHGs, and antibiotic resistance)

35
Identifying bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling in dairy cow manure on farms across California.
J. V. Hagey*1, S. Bhatnagar2, J. M. Heguy3, B. M. Karle3, P. L. Price1, D. Meyer1, and E. M. Maga1, 1University of California, Davis, CA, USA, 2University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, 3University of California Cooperative Extension, CA, USA.
36
Refining direct-fed microbials and silage inoculants for reduction of methane emissions from ruminants.
P. Mbandlwa*1,2, N. Doyle*1,2, C. Hill1,3, C. Stanton2,3, and P. Ross1,3, 1School of Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Munster, Ireland, 2Teagasc Moorepark Food Research Centre, Fermoy, Cork, Munster, Ireland, 3APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, Cork, Munster, Ireland.
*These two authors contributed equally to this work.
37
Evaluation of the potential of two common Pacific Coast macroalgae for mitigating methane emissions from ruminants.
C. Shaw*1, C. Brooke1, B. Roque1, N. Najafi1, M. Gonzalez1, A. Pfefferlen1, V. DeAnada1, D. Ginsburg2, M. Harden2, S. Nuzhdin2, J. Salwen3, E. Kebreab1, and M. Hess1, 1University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA, 2University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 3Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

Immunology (including host–microbe interactions)

38
Low-protein diets supplemented with casein hydrolysate enhance small intestinal barrier functions and inhibit ileal pro-inflammatory cytokine expressions in pigs.
H. Wang*1,2, J. Shen1,2, Y. Pi1,2, K. Gao1,2, Y. Cheng1,2, W. Jin1,2, and W. Zhu1,2, 1Laboratory of Gastrointestinal Microbiology, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Gastrointestinal Nutrition and Animal Health, College of Animal Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China, 2National Center for International Research on Animal Gut Nutrition, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China.
39
Chemotherapy disrupts microbial-enterohepatic bile acid metabolism in mice.
B. R. Loman*1, K. Jordan2, L. M. Pyter2, and M. T. Bailey1,2, 1Center for Microbial Pathogenesis, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA, 2Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
40
Steroid-17,20-desmolase (DesAB) activity from gut and urinary microbes forms 11-oxy-androgens from glucocorticoids in vitro.
L. K. Ly*, J. L. Rowles, S. Devendran, J. W. Erdman, I. K. O. Cann, and J. M. Ridlon, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA.

Microbiology (including ecology, physiology, (meta)genomics, and proteomics)

41
Cellulosome assembly revealed by cryoelectron microscopy.
M. Tatli*1, S. Moraïs2, I. Mizrahi2, and O. Medalia1, 1University of Zurich, Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, 2BenGurion University of the Negev, The Faculty of Natural Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
42
Functional and structural study of 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis strain L2-32.
H. Doden*1, S. Mythen1, R. Pollet2, Z. Wawrzak3, S. Devendran1, I. Cann1, N. Koropatkin2, and J. Ridlon1,4, 1University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA, 2University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, 3Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA, 4Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
43
Characteristics of fecal microbiota in captive Antillean manatees Trichechus manatus manatus.
A. Suzuki*1, K. Ueda2, T. Segawa3,1, and M. Suzuki1, 1Nihon University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan, 2Okinawa Churashima Foundation, Kunigami, Okinawa, Japan, 3Mie University, Tsu, Mie, Japan.
44
The hibernating squirrel microbiome responds to seasonal dietary shifts by altering its functional potential.
E. Chiang*, H. V. Carey, and G. Suen, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
45
Isolation, identification, and phenotypic evaluation of bacteria from infant feces.
H. Kim*, R. Mackie, I. Cann, and S. Donovan, University of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign, IL, USA.
46
Genome-wide transcriptional responses of sensitivity and adaptation of ruminal bacteria to monensin.
N. Kim*, I. K. O. Cann, and R. I. Mackie, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
47
Evaluation of intra-species diversity of Oxalobacter formigenes strains using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.
N. Pareek* and S. Daniel, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA.
48
Dynamics of feed particle colonization by anaerobic fungi.
N. McElhinney*1, R. Evans1, T. M. Callaghan1, S. Huws2, N. R. McEwan3, and G. W. Griffith1, 1Aberystwyth University, Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS), Aberystwyth, United Kingdom, 2School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University, Belfast, United Kingdom, 3School of Pharmacy and Life Science, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
49
Identifying novel antimicrobials from anaerobic rumen fungi.
R. Evans*1, G. W. Griffith1, T. M. Callaghan1, B. Thomas1, and S. A. Huws2, 1IBERS, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, United Kingdom, 2School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University, Belfast, United Kingdom.
50
Methanobrevibacter boviskoreanii JH1T growth on alcohols allows development of a high-throughput bioassay.
Y. Li1, W. Kelly*2, G. Attwood1, P. Reid1, and S. Leahy1, 1AgResearch Limited, Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North, Manawatu, New Zealand, 2Donvis Ltd, Ashhurst, Manawatu, New Zealand.
51
Digestive tract microbiota of beef cattle that differed in feed efficiency.
H. C. Freetly*1, J. Wells1, A. Dickey1, A. Lindholm-Perry1, J. Keele1, and A. Foote2, 1USDA, ARS, US Meat Animal Research, Clay Center, NE, USA, 2Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Stillwater, OK, USA.

Nutrition and metabolism of livestock, humans, and companion animals

52
Influence of an organic acid–based feed additive on intestinal parameters of weaned pigs.
V. Ocelova*1, S. Stelzhammer1, N. Roth1, F. Chen2, C. Fu2, and J. He2, 1BIOMIN Holding GmbH, Erber Campus 1, Getzersdorf, Austria, 2College of Animal Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan, China.
53
Impact of sub-therapeutic Carbadox feeding on growth performance and the fecal microbial population of newly weaned swine.
R. S. Hampton*, M. J. Azain*, J. Lourenco, C. R. Dove, C. E. Edmunds, and T. R. Callaway, Department of Animal and Dairy Science, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
54
Effect of camphor concentrations on caprine in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations.
D. S. Seidel*1, T. R. Whitney2, J. W. Walker2, J. M. Musser3, and T. R. Callaway1, 1University of Georgia Department of Animal and Dairy Science, Athens, GA, USA, 2Texas A&M AgriLife Research, San Angelo, TX, USA, 3Texas A&M University Department of Veterinary Medicine, College Station, TX, USA.
55
Microbiome effects on metabolic efficiencies in easy and hard keeper horses.
A. Johnson* and A. Biddle, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA.
56
Altering the ruminal microbiota in dairy calves using rumen contents dosing.
M. Cox*1, P. Weimer2, A. Steinberger1, J. Skarlupka1, and G. Suen1, 1University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA, 2US Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Madison, WI, USA.
57
Characterization of the epimural microbiota across four geographical locations within the rumen of dairy cows.
D. Sbardellati*1, A. Fischer2, K. Kalscheur2, and G. Suen1, 1Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA, 2USDA Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Madison, WI, USA.

Prebiotics, probiotics, and DFM development

58
Effect of inoculants of lactic acid bacteria on the fermentation quality of ryegrass at different dry matter content.
N. T. Huyen*1, I. Martinez2, and W. F. Pellikaan1, 1Wageningen University and Research, Wageningen, the Netherlands, 2Via Manzoni, Cadorago, Italy.
59
Investigating the effects of direct-fed microbials on beef cattle during an acidosis challenge.
S. Tondini* and J. McCann, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
1800 S. Oak Street, Suite 100
Champaign, Illinois 61820-6974
Phone: (217) 356-3182
Fax: (217) 398-4119
Email: CGIF@assochq.org