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(recordings available until May 31, 2022)

Program

Final 2022 Program and Abstract Book

Monday, April 11

All times listed in central daylight time (CDT)

Special Session: Community Assembly—From Theory to Practice
Chairs: Itzhik Mizrahi, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, and Phil Pope, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway
08:30 – 12:15

Synthetic microbial communities hold the potential of enabling us to understand the basic building blocks of microbiomes, their trophic interactions, and functional consequences in gut microbial communities as well as in other environments. This special session will explore novel technologies for isolating microbial components to construct such communities, basic rules for their assembly, and their usage for answering critical questions in research and application.

08:30
Introduction.
Itzhik Mizrahi, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
08:40
1 — Invited talk: Ordering microbial diversity into ecologically cohesive units.
M. Polz*, Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
09:25
2 — Invited talk: Predicting and designing synthetic human microbiomes.
O. Venturelli*, Departments of Biochemistry, Chemical and Biological Engineering, and Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
10:10
Break
10:30
3 — Invited talk: The world of gut microbiomes through the lens of cultivation.
T. Clavel*, Functional Microbiome Research Group, Institute of Medical Microbiology, University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany.
11:15
4 — Invited talk: Potential drivers of plasticity and persistence in the rumen microbiome.
I. Mizrahi*, The Department of Life Sciences and the National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
12:00
Discussion and synthesis
12:15
Workshop ends
12:15
Lunch break

2022 Opening Session
71st Year Anniversary Event

Invited Presentations and Bryant Memorial Lecture
Chair: Rod Mackie, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
13:30 – 16:30

13:30
Welcome.
Rod Mackie, Chair, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.
13:40
5 — Invited talk: Digital optimization of the feed–microbiome–host nexus.
S. L. La Rosa, T. O. Andersen, I. Altshuler, J. Walter, A. V. P. de Leon, M. Ø. Arntzen, L. H. Hagen, and P. B. Pope*, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
14:25
6 — Invited talk: Unveiling the impact of host–microbiota interactions on animal biology through hologenomics.
A. Alberdi*, Center for Evolutionary Hologenomics, GLOBE Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
15:10
Break
15:30
7 — Bryant Memorial Lecture: A double threat of extinction: What happens to microbial diversity when soil erodes?
J. Handelsman*, Wisconsin Discovery Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, USA.
16:20
Presentation of Honorary Plaque.
Rod Mackie, Chair, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.

Tuesday, April 12

All times listed in central daylight time (CDT)

Podium Presentations: Session 1
Chair: Phil Pope, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway
08:30 – 12:30

08:30
16 — Invited talk: MAGICdb enables predictions of human cardiovascular disease from fecal microbial gene content—or microbial gene content in feces predicts human cardiovascular disease.
M. A. Borton1, M. Shaffer1, D. W. Hoyt2, R. Jiang3, S. Purvine2, C. D. Nicora2, J. Ellenbogen3, E. K. Eder2, A. R. Wong2, A. G. Smulian4, D. J. Ferguson5, M. S. Lipton2, J. A. Krzycki3, and K. C. Wrighton*1, 1Department of Soil and Crop Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA, 2Environmental and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland, WA, USA, 3Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA, 4Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA, 5Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA.
09:15
9 — Sensing and regulation of the breakdown of dietary polysaccharides in Bacteroides spp.
A. M. Abdel-Hamid*1,2, G. V. Pereira1, K. A. Boateng1, N. M. Koropatkin3, R. I. Mackie4, and I. Cann1,4, 1Carl R Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA, 2Department of Botany and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Minia University, El-Minia, Egypt, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, 4Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA.
09:35
10 — The role of TonB in polysaccharide utilization by the Bacteroides.
R. M. Pollet*1, G. Pereira2, M. H. Foley2, E. C. Martens2, and N. M. Koropatkin2, 1Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY, USA, 2University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
09:55
11 — Biochemical analysis and structural prediction of a bifunctional feruloyl esterase from the ruminal anaerobic fungus Pecoramyces sp. F1.
Q. Shi*1, A. Abdel-Hamid2, Y. Li1, Y. Cheng1, I. Cann2, and W. Zhu1, 1Laboratory of Gastrointestinal Microbiology, National Center for International Research on Animal Gut Nutrition, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, 2Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
10:15
Break
10:30
12 — Gut Bacteroidetes for propionate production from polysaccharides.
S. E. Kurrer*, C. Döring, and M. Basen, University of Rostock, Institute of Biological Sciences, Division of Microbiology, Rostock, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany.
10:50
13 — Rnf is involved in propionate production during fermentation in rumen bacteria.
B. Zhang*, C. Lingga, H. De Groot, and T. Hackmann, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
11:10
14 — Structure-mechanism of bacterial 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (DesC) and CRISPR-Cas9 engineering of desC for constitutive expression in Escherichia coli.
J. W. Lee*1,2, M. C. R. Melo3, R. M. Pollet4, H. L. Doden1, S. Devendran1, S. M. Mythen1, S. Bhowmik5, S. A. Lesley5, I. Cann1,2,6,7, N. M. Koropatkin4, R. C. Bernardi8,9, and J. M. Ridlon1,2,6,10,11, 1Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 2Microbiome Metabolic Engineering Theme, Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 3Departments of Psychiatry and Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine; Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, 5Department of Integrative and Computational Biology, Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA, USA, 6Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 7Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 8NIH Center for Macromolecular Modeling and Bioinformatics, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 9Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA, 10Center for Advanced Study, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 11Cancer Center at Illinois, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
11:30
15 — Effects of barley variety (hulled vs. hull-less) and head type (2 vs. 6 row) on rumen fermentation, dry matter disappearance and fermentation characteristics in batch culture.
W. Z. Yang*1, A. M Saleem2,1, R. M. Bierworth3,1, J. Nyachiro4, L. Oatway5, and T. A. McAllister1, 1Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Lethbridge, AB, Canada, 2Animal and Poultry Production Department, South Valley University, Qena, Egypt, 3Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada, 4Field Crop Development Centre, Lacombe, AB Canada, 5Olds College, Olds, AB, Canada.
11:50
Break
12:00
Business meeting: CGIF 2022 (open to all registrants)
13:00
Lunch break

Podium Presentations: Session 2
Chair: Isaac Cann, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
13:30 – 16:40

13:30
8 — Invited talk: Opposing roles for mucin-degrading bacteria and bacterial protein metabolites in the development of intestinal inflammation.
E. Martens*, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
14:15
17 — Common viral inactivation techniques affect 16S rRNA amplicon-based analysis of the gut microbiota.
Z. McAdams*, K. Gustafson, and A. Ericsson, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA
14:35
18 — Biogeography may be key to microbial anti-inflammatory production using dietary precursors in inflammatory bowel disease mouse models.
S Ishaq*1, Y Li1, J Holman1, T Zhang2, G Mawe3, M Hurd3, B Lavoie3, G Chen4, D Baudewyns2, L Colucci2, J Balkan1, and P Moses5, 1University of Maine, Orono, ME, USA, 2Husson University, Bangor, ME, USA, 3University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA, 4University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, 5Finch Therapeutics, VT, USA.
14:55
20 — Creation of a gut microbial and viral genome catalog exposes gene content and taxonomic variation in inflamed and noninflamed mice.
I. Leleiwi*1, M. Schaffer1, M. A. Borton1,2, A. Sabag-Daigle2, J. Rodriguez-Ramos1, R. A. Daly1, R. Flynn1, B. Ahmer2, and K. C. Wrighton1, 1Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA, 2Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
15:15
Break
15:40
21 — Fecal matter transplantation restores the gastrointestinal microbial populations following a traumatic brain injury in a pediatric porcine model.
C. B. Welch*, M. M. Fagan, S. E. Sneed, K. M. Scheulin, J. H. Jeon, M. E. Golan, H. J. Park, T. R. Callaway, K. J. Duberstein, T. D. Pringle, J. M. Lourenco, and F. D. West, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
16:05
22 — The maternal oral microbiota significantly contributes to the neonatal gut microbiota composition in CD-1 mice.
A. L. Russell*, E. Donovan, N. Seilhamer, K. Gustafson, and A. C. Ericsson, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA.

Wednesday, April 13

All times listed in central daylight time (CDT)

Podium Presentations: Session 3
Chair: Itzhik Mizrahi, Ben Gurion University, Israel
09:00 – 11:30

09:00
23 — Invited talk: Enrichment of gut microbiomes from herbivores: Engineering carbon flux through microbial diversity and selection.
M. A. O’Malley*, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA.
09:50
24 — Genome-centric metaproteomics reveals metabolic influence of the ciliate Entodinium caudatum within the rumen microbiome.
T. O. Andersen*1, I. Altshuler1, A. V. P. de Leon2, C. Martin3, L. Bernard3, H. Fougere3, D. P. Morgavi3, J. L. Firkins4, Z. Yu4, T. R. Hvidsten2, M. Popova3, M. Ø. Arntzen2, L. H. Hagen2, and P. B Pope1, 1Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Faculty of Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway, 2Faculty of Chemisty, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway, 3Université Clermont Auvergne, INRAE, VetAgro Sup, UMR Herbivores, Saint-Genes-Champanelle, France, 4Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
10:10
25 — Polyclonal antibodies inhibit growth of key cellulolytic rumen bacterial species.
S. M. Tondini*, R. I. Mackie, and J. C. McCann, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
10:30
Break
10:50
26 — Supplementation of slow-release urea affects rumen microbial community in an artificial rumen system.
Y. Guo1,2, L. Jin2, L. Xiao3, S. Yan1, and W. Yang*2, 1Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, China, 2Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Lethbridge, AB, Canada, 3Hangzhou King Techina Feed Co. Ltd., Hangzhou City, China.
11:10
27 — Impacts of irrigating triticale with dairy lagoon wastewater before harvest and treating with a bacterial inoculant at harvest on the chemical composition, fermentation quality, and bacterial community of silage.
O. Y. Koyun*, J. M. Lourenco, T. R. Callaway, S. Tao, and J. K. Bernard, Department of Animal and Dairy Science, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
11:30
Lunch break

Podium Presentations: Session 4
Chair: Jeff Firkins, The Ohio State University, USA
13:00 – 15:30

13:00
28 — Invited talk: The scientific accomplishments of Dr. Milton J. Allison (1931–2022)—Microbiologist.
M. Rasmussen*1, S. Daniel2, and R. Anderson3, 1Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA, 2Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, USA, 3USDA/ARS, College Station, TX, USA.
13:50
29 — Branched-chain volatile fatty acid conversion into branched-chain amino acids and lipid synthesis in dual-flow cultures varying in forage and polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations.
K. E. Mitchell*1, S. L. Kienzle1, B. A. Wenner1, C. Lee2, D. H. Kleinschmit3, M. T. Socha3, and J. L. Firkins1, 1Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA, 2Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, USA, 3Zinpro Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN, USA.
14:10
30 — Effects of dosing nontoxigenic Clostridia on bacterial populations and immunological responses in the intestinal tract of lactating dairy cows.
H. W. Kim*1, A. H. Smith2, J. S. Thompson2, T. G. Rehberger2, M. N. Griffin2, F. F. Cardoso1, F. Cardoso1, and R. I. Mackie1, 1University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA, 2Church & Dwight Co. Inc., Waukesha, WI, USA.
14:30
31 — The equine microbiome’s subtle responses to dietary challenges can be seen over time.
A. C. B. Johnson* and A. S. Biddle, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA.
14:50
Break
15:10
Presentation of Russell Awards
Best oral presentations by graduate students and young investigators
15:15
Closing remarks and invitation to CGIF 2024
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